What is Hospice?

Posted by in Expert Advice.

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month. Senior Lifestyle recognizes hospice care as a vital component of person-centered senior care, and while we realize the subject of hospice is often fraught with both emotion and confusion, we feel that this often-misunderstood facet of senior care is a valuable option that many families don’t explore because of the misconceptions surrounding it. This year’s theme for Hospice Month, “A
Program That Works. A Benefit That Matters”, sheds light on the purpose and aim of hospice: a focus on caring instead of curing, allowing patients with life-limiting illnesses to navigate their end-of-life journey with dignity and compassionate care. 

The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization shares some history about hospice care, noting that the first modern hospice, St. Christopher’s Hospice, was created in suburban London by physician Dame Cicely Saunders. Saunders began working with terminally ill patients in 1948 and coined the term “hospice” to describe specialized care provided for dying patients. In 1963, while serving as a guest lecturer at Yale University, Dame Saunders introduced the concept of hospice care to medical students, nurses, social workers and chaplains. Pointing to photographic evidence of terminal patients with their families, she showed the dramatic improvement brought about by providing symptom control care. Hospice care as we know it today is a direct result of this lecture. 

Six important points to know about hospice from NHPCO: 

  1. Hospice care is usually provided in the home – wherever the patient calls home. This includes assisted living communities and other long-term-care settings. 
  1. Hospice cares for people with any kind of life-limiting illness. Patients of every age and religion can access hospice care. 
  1. Hospice is fully covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private health plans and HMOs. 
  1. Hospice is not limited to six months of care. Patients and families are encouraged to contact a hospice provider when they receive a terminal diagnosis instead of waiting until the “last days” to benefit from all that hospice care has to offer. Pain management and symptom control offer significant physical benefits for patients as well as increased quality of life. 
  1. Hospice is not “giving up”; rather the focus is on caring, not curing. Hospice organizations are also trained to help family members cope with the emotional aspects of caring for a terminally ill loved one, as well as the grieving process when that loved one passes. 
  1. Anyone can contact hospice – so call your local program to learn if hospice is right for you or your loved one. Each hospice provider in an area may do things slightly differently, so choose an organization based on your needs. Many hospitals and skilled care facilities can offer suggestions or information on hospice care. 

Senior Lifestyle communities welcome hospice organizations as care partners and recognize the incredibly vital service they provide not only for our residents but their families as well. Our communities partner with hospice organizations to provide care for our residents who choose to walk their end-of-life journey with us; we are honored to do so. To learn more about services and lifestyle options at a Senior Lifestyle community in your area, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

Diabetes Awareness Month

Posted by in Health and Fitness, Expert Advice.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to shed some light on the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and encourage everyone to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test, a free, anonymous test to assess personal risk factors for the disease. Every year, more than one million people are diagnosed with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, the disease is the 7th leading cause of death in America. Almost 85 million Americans aged 18 and older have prediabetes, and over 25% of seniors have the disease. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases with age 

At Senior Lifestyle our goal is to help those we serve live healthy, full lives; with that in mind we’re sharing some basic tips from the American Diabetes Association’s Living Healthy With Diabetes guide to help control the disease and avoid complications. You can also download the entire Living Healthy With Diabetes guide for your use at home. 

Weight Control 

For diabetics, maintaining a healthy weight can help manage the disease. For those who are overweight, losing even 10 to 15 pounds can make a difference. The American Diabetes Association recommends the Plate Method as an aid to creating a healthy diet.  

The Plate Method: 

  1. Imagine drawing a line down the middle of your dinner plate. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have 3 sections on your plate. 
  1. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes. 
  1. Now in one of the smaller sections, put starchy foods such as noodles, rice, corn, or potatoes. 
  1. The other small section is for meat, fish, chicken, eggs, or tofu. 
  1. Add an 8 oz glass of milk and one small piece of fruit or 1/2 cup of fruit salad and you’ve got a great meal. (If you don’t drink milk, you can add an extra piece of fruit, light yogurt, or a small roll.) 

Physical Activity 

Being active is another great way to help control the symptoms of diabetes and avoid complications. Be sure to speak to your doctor about what types of activity he recommends. Everyday activities like gardening, walking, raking leaves and carrying groceries can count toward your physical activity. Any physical activity can help lower your blood glucose; however, there are other benefits to maintaining a healthy habit of being physically active. 

Other benefits of physical activity include:  

  • Improving your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol
  • Having more energy
  • Relieving stress
  • Burning calories to help you lose or maintain your weight
  • Keeping your joints flexible
  • Increasing your strength
  • Improving your balance to prevent falls
  • Lowering your risk for heart disease and stroke

Medication Management 

If you have other conditions in addition to diabetes, you may be taking several different medications to manage those conditions as well as your diabetes. It is important to take each medication as prescribed and discuss any changes with your doctor. In order to stay on top of your medication schedule, the Living Healthy With Diabetes guide suggests the following: 

  • Keep an updated list of your medicines (prescription, nonprescription, dietary supplements including vitamins, and herbal remedies). Record important information about each medicine.  
  • Take all of your medicines exactly as your doctor tells you.  
  • Use one pharmacy to fill all your prescriptions if possible.  
  • Keep medicines in a cool, dry place.  
  • Use a pill organizer.  
  • Use a reminder timer, an alarm clock, or your mobile phone alarm to remind you when to take medicine.  
  • Link pill-taking to something in your daily routine (for example, take your medicine right after you brush your teeth).  
  • Use a chart or dry erase board to keep track of your pill-taking. 

At Senior Lifestyle, we encourage you to observe Diabetes Awareness Month, take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test, and if you do find yourself at an elevated risk for the disease, speak with your physician about what you can do to lessen your risk of diabetes. Many of the tips we’ve noted above are helpful in avoiding diabetes as well as living with it. To learn more about what we do to stay healthy and active at a Senior Lifestyle community near you, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

Time For A Change?

Posted by in Expert Advice.

At Senior Lifestyle, we know that providing care for a loved one can be a daunting task, as well as an infinitely rewarding one. We understand that caregivers face an ever-changing array of challenges daily; frustration often walks hand in hand with fulfillment as the caregiver provides for both the physical and emotional needs of their loved one and outside support is vital for family caregivers at times when they are unable to be with their loved one. For families without this support, a visit can become quite stressful for both the caregiver and the senior, with quality time often taking a backseat to more urgent matters such as bill-payment and yard maintenance.  

Many caregivers describe the pull between practical matters and quality time as a balancing act. For adult children, this balancing act can become more difficult with each visit as more help with activities of daily living becomes necessary for the senior. Relationships between child and parent can become strained as their roles change. Adult children often feel guilty when unable to visit parents as often as they’d like, and even guiltier when they must delegate everyday tasks to their loved one’s friends or neighbors. Ironically, subtle changes in a loved one’s physical appearance, behavior, and ability to manage their surroundings are often more apparent to a long-distance caregiver than to a friend or neighbor who sees the senior regularly. 

When visiting a loved one, there are some behaviors to watch for that may indicate a change is necessary for the senior:  

 

  • Is the refrigerator adequately stocked? Is the food spoiled? Preparing meals can become a difficult task for the senior; it may be time to look into meal delivery or help with meal prep. 

 

  • Are there noticeable changes in the condition of the home? If your loved one has always been neat and tidy and you find that cleaning is going undone, this may be a sign that help is needed with housekeeping duties. The same holds true for personal appearance; dressing and grooming can become burdensome and exhausting for some seniors with decreased mobility.  

 

  • Are the bills paid? Do you notice unopened piles of mail? Paying bills and balancing a checkbook can become stressful for your loved one. A trusted friend or family member may need to step in to keep up with money matters. 

 

Finding local resources is a key factor in successful caregiving. Homecare agencies have been a boon to the aging-in-place trend and can often help keep a senior living safely at home longer by providing assistance with activities of daily living such as cleaning, cooking, and laundry. Local senior centers can often provide referrals for services as well. The National Institute on Aging has made several valuable resources available for caregivers who’d like to learn more about how to make the most out of the time they are able to spend with loved ones.   

Discovering that your loved one needs more care or help with activities of daily living than can be managed at home? Visit our website to learn more about respite care, independent and assisted living options in your area. Senior Lifestyle believes that preparing for and researching next steps such as respite care and assisted living can help caregivers focus more on quality time with loved ones and less on practical matters relating to safety and care. Shifting this focus helps families make the most of each visit, and that’s what counts.

How Are We Doing?

Posted by in Expert Advice, Technology.

There’s a common saying that notes, “If customers are happy with your service, they’ll tell you; if they aren’t happy, they’ll tell everyone else,” and with the prevalence of online review sites today, that idea can seem uncomfortably accurate for some businesses. However, online reviews give customers the opportunity to point out not only what’s wrong, but what’s right as well. They also give the reviewee an opportunity to make things right by reaching out to the customer when a negative experience is reported. At Senior Lifestyle we look at reviews as a vital tool in our plan for continuous improvement and encourage everyone we interact with to share their experience.

Are we doing well? What can we do better? Every business asks these questions, but without feedback from customers, it’s often hard to judge the answers. Any business with a long-range plan wants to hear the bad reviews as well as the stellar ones; continuous improvement depends on knowing what needs to be improved upon. Reviews provide companies with valuable information that may not be evident at the point of sale. Consumers can leave online reviews for nearly any business, product or service, from a hospital stay to a pet grooming experience. Review sites like Indeed and Glassdoor even provide a forum for job-seekers to learn more about companies for whom they hope to work.

Why do people leave online reviews? Everyone likes to be heard; we share our opinions every day in conversations with friends, family and co-workers, so it makes sense to share those opinions with the companies from which we purchase products and services. Oftentimes, online reviewers can remain anonymous, an aspect which may pave the way for more honest evaluations. Honest feedback, whether positive or negative, not only helps the organization being reviewed, but helps fellow consumers make decisions as well.

Senior Lifestyle believes that informed consumers and potential team members make better choices, and we truly want feedback from our senior community residents, families and team members. We gain valuable insight from visitors in our communities as well, whether they volunteer, provide a service for our residents or come to the community for a tour. Our goal is to provide the best possible experience for everyone we interact with, so don’t hesitate to let us know how we’re doing! For more information on how Senior Lifestyle works to provide an exceptional experience or to learn more about any of our communities, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

Downsizing Tips For Seniors

Posted by in Expert Advice.

Once the decision to move to a senior community has been made, the community has been chosen and a suitable living space secured, what happens next? Most families face this question after the initial decision-making is complete. At Senior Lifestyle, our goal is to make each move as seamless and stress-free as possible for new residents and their families, and with over 30 years of experience helping families manage the move-in process, we’ve identified some steps that may require additional guidance, and perhaps some extra patience!

Quite often, the most daunting task that faces seniors or their loved ones when contemplating a move to senior living is tackling the issue of “stuff”. Identifying what stays and what goes is a difficult process for many, and most times this difficulty is magnified by the memories attached to each treasure. For most, the downsizing process is an emotional one to begin with, and this sorting just adds to the burden. Even the home itself holds memories and can be hard to leave. It can help to have family members step in to move this process forward, especially those who understand the emotional attachment to certain items.

Some key tips for downsizing:

  1. Be clear on the size and layout of your loved one’s new living space. Keeping an item only to find that it just doesn’t fit into the new home’s area can be frustrating and time-consuming.
  2. Start with the least-used areas of your loved one’s home. The items in these areas may have slightly less sentimental value; therefore, decision-making will be a bit easier.
  3. Have a family get-together! If certain items are to be distributed to family members, sharing the history and memories attached to each object can be a meaningful way to pass them to new owners.
  4. Take photos. In addition to sharing the sentimental value of items shared, photos of the item with its new owner can ease the burden of parting with that item. Knowing that a cherished treasure will be well-loved may also aid in the “letting-go” process for your loved one.

Remember, making a move can be a stressful event for seniors, but with some patience and a clear understanding of your loved one’s needs in a new home, the downsizing process can be a positive experience for everyone involved. Sharing memories is a wonderful start to a new beginning in a senior community, so make the most of this opportunity! For additional information on any aspect of the move-in process, or to learn more about a Senior Lifestyle community in your area, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

Home Safety For Seniors

Posted by in Expert Advice, Research.

Safety at home is vitally important for seniors. Family members of senior loved ones often cite safety at home as a major factor when looking for assisted living arrangements, with concerns ranging from possible falls to the ability of the senior to operate home appliances safely. At Senior Lifestyle, we understand the concerns of family members as well as the need for the senior to retain as much independence as possible, so we’ve compiled some home safety tips to share.

FALLS

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one out of four seniors falls each year, with less than half of that number informing their doctor about the accident. While many falls don’t result in serious injury, one in five causes an injury such as a hip fracture or head injury. The CDC makes several recommendations for fall prevention:

  • Remove throw rugs and excess clutter like books and magazines from the floor, especially in high traffic areas. Be sure extension cords are secured and check for loose flooring that could present a trip hazard.
  • Be sure your home has adequate lighting; install bulbs that provide bright light with no glare. Automatic night lights are a great idea for nighttime trips to the bathroom or kitchen.
  • Install railings on both sides of stairs, as well as grab bars in the bathroom, both inside and outside the shower or tub and next to the toilet.
  • Keep walkways outside the home clear of grass clippings, weeds and mulch in the summer and ice and snow in the winter. Be sure to install exterior lighting near all entrances to the home.

BURNS

Burns are unfortunately one of the most common accidents at home for seniors, and since older adults do not respond well to burn treatments, burn and fire prevention are critical for safety at home. According to homeadvisor.com, individuals with balance, vision or memory issues experience a higher risk of burns. To lessen the risk of a fire or severe burn, keep the following in mind:

  • Set water heaters to a lower temperature. Conditions such as peripheral neuropathy interfere with some seniors’ ability to feel pain, leaving them vulnerable to burns. Some medications also inhibit the pain response, so decreasing the water temperature helps manage this risk.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen and install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors throughout the home. Look at ways to simplify cooking, such as the use of a microwave instead of a conventional stove or oven. Many communities offer meal services for seniors as well, with home delivery or a community dining room available.
  • Remove sources of fire, such as lighters, candles and cigarettes if the senior is unable to use these safely. Plan an escape route as well, practicing the route frequently. Post emergency numbers in an easily accessible area of the home.

MEDICATION SAFETY

Many seniors take multiple medications for chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease; additionally, medications are often prescribed for acute conditions such as infections or injuries, leading to a complex daily regimen that can increase the risk of accidental overdose. With older adults often seeing several different medical providers, the risk of unsafe drug interactions is also increased. Safemedication.com recommends some commonsense tips to decrease this risk:

  • Keep a list of each medication taken, both prescribed and over-the-counter. Include all vitamins and supplements. Provide this list to each doctor at each visit, as well as a trusted family member or friend in case of emergency. Talk to your provider about any side effects experienced.
  • Use one pharmacy. The pharmacist can check for drug interactions and help to maintain a current medication list.
  • Stay on schedule. Take all medications exactly as prescribed and maintain a daily routine to help decrease the risk of a missed dose or an accidental overdose.

At Senior Lifestyle, we know that whether your senior loved one is living in their own home, with a family member, or in a senior community, safety at home is a concern, and it’s a priority in our communities. For more information about a Senior Lifestyle community in your area, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

How to talk about senior living

Posted by in Expert Advice.

At Senior Lifestyle, we’re been helping seniors and their families navigate the senior care journey for over 30 years. We understand the uncertainty and questions as well as the obstacles that accompany many families on their journey and we strive to provide exceptional guidance and support. We also know that many families meet with resistance from their senior loved one when searching for quality senior care. Talking about senior living is an important first step in the journey.

Do you have concerns about a loved living at home alone? Are you worried that the stress of running a household is causing health problems for your loved one? If so, talking about senior living options may help allay your fears and allow your senior loved one to verbalize their concerns as well. Additionally, the subject will be easier to discuss later when the need arises if you’ve already started the conversation.

Some tips for a healthy discussion about senior care:

Start the conversation early

Don’t wait until a health crisis forces your hand; it’s much easier to make decisions about senior care when you and your loved one don’t feel pressured to make a quick decision. It’s much less stressful to talk about senior living in terms of “future planning” than in terms of deciding now. Remember that this is simply a first step, and you don’t have to have all the answers after your first conversation.

Be empathetic

Understand that talking about senior living may be difficult for your loved one, especially if they’ve been living independently and are only recently experiencing difficulties. They may feel that the situation will correct itself in time and want to save the conversation for later. Put yourself in their shoes when starting the conversation about senior care and tread lightly in your first attempts to broach the subject. The discussion should be framed as a partnership with you and your loved one about options and alternatives to the current situation.

Find the right time and place

Timing is important. Find a time when you can be uninterrupted, as well as a location that feels neutral and safe for the conversation. Talking about senior living is much more appropriate and comfortable in a quiet corner of the local coffee shop or at the kitchen table than in a crowded restaurant or in the middle of a family event.

Do your homework

Preparing a little in advance is always helpful. Write down your specific concerns so that you have “talking points” when you have a conversation with your loved one. They may actually share your concerns and have ideas of what they need and want, which is a vital consideration when discussing senior care. Presenting options during your conversation about senior care shows that you’ve given the subject some thought and want to help your loved one make a choice they are comfortable with.

While it can be difficult to discuss life changes with a senior loved one, at Senior Lifestyle we know that the conversation doesn’t have to be a source of strife. With some advance preparation, talking about senior living can be a positive step toward a better quality of life for your loved one. For more information about senior living options in your area or to schedule a tour of one of our senior communities, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.

Why choose assisted living?

Posted by in Health and Fitness, Expert Advice, Programs.

If you’re currently looking at moving to a senior community and comparing the benefits of moving to Assisted Living versus staying at home or “aging in place” you may have quite a few questions on the relative merit of each option. At Senior Lifestyle we believe that information is the most valuable tool we can offer prospective residents and families, so we’d like to share some of what we’ve learned from over 30 years in senior living.

When searching for Assisted Living in a senior community, it’s important to know what features are truly beneficial to you and what type of living fits your personal needs. It’s your lifestyle to choose, and we feel strongly that the process should be about just that: your life and your style! What can you expect from a Senior Lifestyle community?

Peace of mind

We call it “Care that’s always there”. Families can rest assured that their loved one will always have assistance available. Assistance with everyday needs is a moment away, and a wearable emergency call pendant or in-room pull-cord can summon help in an emergency. Licensed staff is on hand 24 hours a day to meet your needs.

Social opportunities

We often say that our residents love their apartments but don’t spend much time in them. Activities and events designed specifically for seniors provide each resident with opportunities to make friends every day, whether staying in or going out on the town. We tailor our programming to the needs and wants of residents and help build relationships along the way.

Independence

Our goal at every senior community is to remove worries about housekeeping, yard maintenance, shoveling snow, or any of the other daily chores that can take up your valuable time. Your time is better spent enjoying all that your new lifestyle has to offer! You’ll enjoy dining with friends in an inviting atmosphere that rivals any local eatery, with locally sourced ingredients prepared with care by our Executive Chef.

Help when it’s needed

Assistance with medications, dressing, bathing and other activities of daily living is available as part of your Personalized Service Plan, which can be adjusted as your needs change. We’ll build your plan to fit you and work with you to deliver the care and services you need.

For more information on Assisted Living in a Senior Lifestyle community near you, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com. Our knowledgeable staff will be happy to schedule a tour of a senior community in your area and show you a lifestyle that provides all the comforts of home!

Senior Support Groups

Posted by in Expert Advice.

What can a support group do for me? When faced with a difficult diagnosis for yourself or a loved one and presented with the opportunity to attend a meeting, you may be asking yourself this question. Different support groups exist for many health conditions, bringing people together who face similar problems and offering a place to share not only problems but solutions as well. At Senior Lifestyle, we’ve seen the positive impact of support groups for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and other illnesses, as well as those focused on the demands of long-term caregiving, and while some people may not need or want the support beyond that offered by family and friends, support groups offer many benefits for members.

Support groups are made up of individuals who share a common interest or health concern. Most groups focus on a specific condition or situation and are often started by a person with the condition or another involved person, such as a family member. The format varies, with some support groups meeting in person, some by telephone, and others on the Internet; the form of support that works best for an individual is often dictated by geographical location, the nature of the condition, and personal preference. Groups may be led by a facilitator with clinical experience in treating a specific illness or by a member of the group. Additionally, the group may be structured, with specific goals and agendas for each meeting, or it may be more oriented toward social connections and shared experiences.

Whatever the structure, support groups provide connections with others who share similar problems, as well as emotional and moral support. Quite often, members also share practical advice and coping skills for those facing a new diagnosis or at the beginning of a caregiving journey.

Benefits of support groups may include:

  • Emotional support, less isolation

Sharing fears and frustrations, receiving support without judgement, and reassurance that others share similar problems provides support group members with an outlet for feelings that friends and family who aren’t in the same situation may not fully understand.

  • Practical advice and information

Members of support group are in the unique position to share advice about treatment, medication and alternative options. Exchanging information about positive outcomes can empower members of the group to take a more active role in their care or seek out treatment options previously unknown to them.

  • Developing coping skills and managing expectations

For someone facing a new diagnosis, having the opportunity to speak openly and frankly with a support group member whose disease and treatment is more advanced can be comforting as well as educational. For many, lack of information on what to expect is frightening, and a “veteran” can provide valuable insight into treatment and progression of the disease.

While support groups are not a substitute for medical care, the old proverb “A trouble shared is a trouble halved” holds true. The benefits of sharing difficulties as well as practical advice can make dealing with a new diagnosis a little less daunting and managing a long-term condition a little less isolating. For more information about support groups in your community, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com to find a community near you.

Fight the Flu

Posted by in Health and Fitness, Expert Advice.

The flu season is in full swing, but that doesn’t mean you have to join the party. At Senior Lifestyle, we know that a bout of influenza is not only miserable with its hallmark symptoms of fever, body aches, cough, sore throat and fatigue, it’s also dangerous for seniors, young children, and anyone with a compromised immune system. The flu can worsen existing chronic conditions such as asthma, COPD, and chronic congestive heart failure. While complications of the flu can happen to anyone, the risk is higher for these groups, so it is critical to avoid infection and remain vigilant during flu season to prevent exposure to the flu.

Flu shots are the first line of defense against seasonal flu, while good hygiene and common sense play a part in avoiding the flu as well. At Senior Lifestyle, our goal is to keep our residents, team members and families as healthy as possible at all times, including flu season, so we’re sharing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Take 3” list of preventive measures, which includes tips to limit the duration and severity of the flu if infection should occur:

  • Vaccinate! First and foremost, getting a yearly flu shot is the best bet in preventing the flu. The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older receive the vaccine before the flu season hits their community, ideally before the end of October each year. While no vaccine can prevent every strain of the virus, the yearly vaccine is based on research that indicates which strains are most likely. It is vital that health care workers, those who provide care for infants under 6 months of age, and those at higher risk of complications of the flu be vaccinated.
  • Stop Germs. Good handwashing practices are a great defense against the flu. Wash hands often with soap and water. Limit the spread of germs by avoiding touching your nose, eyes and mouth. If you do become ill, stay home! Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and limit your contact with others until you are fever-free for at least 24 hours to avoid spreading the flu.
  • Take antiviral flu drugs if your doctor prescribes them. Antiviral medications can limit the duration and severity of the flu. For those at risk of complications of the flu, antiviral medications can mean the difference between a mild illness and a hospital stay. According to the CDC, antiviral drugs work best when started within 48 hours of the start of flu symptoms, but they can still be effective if started later, especially for people at risk of flu complications. Antiviral medications must be prescribed by a doctor.

At Senior Lifestyle, we understand that flu season is no fun, but taking commonsense precautions like vaccinating and handwashing can help you avoid becoming ill. If the flu does hit, be sure to limit your interaction with others until your illness abates, and take antiviral medications if prescribed by your doctor. For more information about what we are doing in our communities to combat this illness, please visit our website at www.seniorlifestyle.com.